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We visited an awesome museum but the highlight of the day was food. Again.

We visited an awesome museum but the highlight of the day was food. Again.

On Sunday we went to the very big and very impressive National Museum of Anthropology and I didn't carry my camera around! So this post will be a bit shorter, a little less numerous on the photos, and also I'm very tired.

Sunday was the first day that I began to feel a little more comfortable in Mexico -- both my basic Spanish was becoming more sturdy, and it was the third day of being sunburned, so I could move around without being in absolute agony. I was still very conscious of the fact that I looked like a touristy pillock, but we were in a museum, where the lighting was lower to preserve both the exhibits and my dignity.

The museum was in the massive park in the city, El Bosque de Chapultepec. On Sundays, it's clearly the place to be.

The museum was in the massive park in the city, El Bosque de Chapultepec. On Sundays, it's clearly the place to be.

The museum was massive. We would've needed at least two days to do all of it. As it was, we spent almost 4 hours just wandering around the bottom floors of the various exhibits. Even then, we weren't spending too long on any one part, as we couldn't read most of the accompanying information panels. If we'd been taking our time, we would've needed the best part of a week.

From the outside looking in: the museum's entrance with the seal above the doors

From the outside looking in: the museum's entrance with the seal above the doors

All that being said though, the museum's contents did get a little repetitive toward the end. "Here's some pottery and sculptures of a pre-hispanic Mexican tribe from about 20 miles down the road from the last ones you looked at, that differ slightly but not really in any objective way."

From the inside, the architecture of the museum was stunning. I wish I'd kept my camera with me, but I didn't feel like paying the photography fee, or hauling it around.

From the inside, the architecture of the museum was stunning. I wish I'd kept my camera with me, but I didn't feel like paying the photography fee, or hauling it around.

I don't mean to trivialise the artefacts that they had though. I genuinely did find the history fascinating, and having learned so little about Central and South American cultures during all my many years of schooling, let alone pre-European involvement in those areas, I found myself lapping up this whole new world I was rapidly learning of and about.

It started raining while we were in the museum, which was one of the reasons we'd decided to go. But as soon as the rain came down, they closed all the little outdoor exhibits, meaning we couldn't go and check out this insanely cool wall any closer. I got a good photo between the crack in the doors though.

It started raining while we were in the museum, which was one of the reasons we'd decided to go. But as soon as the rain came down, they closed all the little outdoor exhibits, meaning we couldn't go and check out this insanely cool wall any closer. I got a good photo between the crack in the doors though.

I think everyone is in agreement that the Egyptians are a super cool subject of history. This was like finding out that there was a whole other empire of Egyptian scale and historical importance. They too had pyramids, as you may know. Almost makes you wish that white people didn't wipe out every other civilisation's history and culture when they conquered. I'm sure it would've been really interesting.

The other jewel of the park is the Castle, El Castillo de Chapultepec. We tried to go here after the museum, but it closed at five. No matter, we went later. More to come on this.

The other jewel of the park is the Castle, El Castillo de Chapultepec. We tried to go here after the museum, but it closed at five. No matter, we went later. More to come on this.

After spending several hours at the museum a'learnin', we were pretty hungry. So we grabbed an ear of Mexican street corn, named elote, to snack on. Lia and I had become quite partial to trying this last summer, when I'd make it on the grill we had on our little deck. I'd been looking forward to trying the real deal. Surprisingly, corn slathered in mayo, butter, cheese, and chilli powder didn't disappoint.

Before I sign off though, I do feel the need to mention that the best meal I've ever eaten occurred on this Sunday, March 12th. We went to a taco place called Califa on the recommendation of our Airbnb, and ate like gods. I had a sublime al pastor taco, a steak and cheese taco, and most importantly, a thing called "chicharron de queso," with al pastor pork taco meat. It's a soft taco shell, and the filling is beautiful al pastor wrapped in melty grilled cheese. It was one of the best things I've ever eaten. Lia had two veggie dishes which were also heavy on the cheese, just to make things even better. After a Mexican coca cola, I was stuffed, and the happiest I'd been so far on the whole trip.

The food was so good, I didn't even stop to take a picture of it. It'll forever be my little secret.

The park had some denser areas of trees and foliage, and while we barely covered a fraction of it -- it's bigger than Central Park in NYC by a lot! -- what we did explore was beautiful. 

The park had some denser areas of trees and foliage, and while we barely covered a fraction of it -- it's bigger than Central Park in NYC by a lot! -- what we did explore was beautiful. 

My sweet babe

My sweet babe

A rant about Delta with lots of pretty pictures

A rant about Delta with lots of pretty pictures

We interrupt your regularly scheduled programming to bring you a video about menswear

We interrupt your regularly scheduled programming to bring you a video about menswear